Tag Archives: evangelicalism

Upcoming Conference: Biblical Interpretation and Early Transatlantic Evangelicalism

A recent scholarly trend in Edwards studies has sought to remedy the glaring neglect of Jonathan Edwards‘ biblical exegesis. However, the same problem still exists for early transatlantic evangelicalism more generally.

To work towards filling this lacuna, the Jonathan Edwards Center Germany is co-hosting a conference with the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies on the topic of Biblical Interpretation and Early Transatlantic Evangelicalism. It takes place September 21-22, 2018 on the campus of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

The speakers include the conference hosts: the Director of the JE Center Germany, Jan Stievermann, and the Director of the Andrew Fuller Center, Michael Haykin. Joining them is a team of world-class scholars in the field (including notable Edwards scholars): Douglas Sweeney, Ken Minkema, Isabel Rivers, Bruce Hindmarsh, Crawford Gribben, Adriaan Neele, and Robert Brown.

Here’s the description from the conference website:

The objective of the conference aims to bring the historiography of early transatlantic evangelicalism together with the history of biblical interpretation. The goal is to understand the exegesis of various eighteenth-century exegetes in their intellectual, cultural, and religious contexts. 

Two recent academic developments have largely inspired the vision for this conference. The first is the recent interest devoted to Jonathan Edwards as an exegete. Scholars like Douglas Sweeney, Robert Brown, and Stephen Stein have shed important light on Edwards’ theology, ministry, and context by engaging his exegesis. The second is the publication of Cotton Mather’s Biblia Americana by a team of scholars under the editorial leadership of Reiner Smolinski and Jan Stievermann. These volumes (so far Vol. 1, 3, 4, 5, and 9 have been published) have yielded tremendous insight into early American literature, intellectual history, and religious expression.

However, more work is needed to understand the role of biblical interpretation in the early evangelical movement from a transatlantic perspective, as well as the important (but largely neglected) role of evangelicals in the broader history of biblical interpretation.

More information on the speakers, paper titles, schedule, registration, location etc. can be found here: http://events.sbts.edu/andrewfullerconference/

 

Jonathan Edwards, lifestyle brand

A lot of people like reading Jonathan Edwards. But maybe that’s not enough for you. Maybe you want to wear Jonathan Edwards.

You can!

Jonathan Edwards comes on a tee shirt, thanks to Missional Wear, an Orlando, Florida company that boasts “the largest selection in Reformed lifestyle products anywhere!”ms-MilitaryGreen-w-large.jpg

That’s an advertizing claim that seems like it’s probably true.

Missional Wear is certainly the only company selling Jonathan Edwards tee shirts in all sizes and more than a dozen colors for about $20.

Edwards’s face does not appear to be as the most popular for Reformed lifestyle products, however.

The most popular is the 19th century British Baptist preacher, Charles Spurgeon. The company offers multiple versions of his face, including several that show him smoking a cigar and one that has a stylized representation of Spurgeon’s beard, with a quote from Spurgeon about beards.

There are also shirts and hoodies with other faces from the Reformed canon, including Reformers such as Martin Luther, John Calvin and John Knox and Puritans such as John Owen, John Bunyan and Richard Baxter. The company also offers shirts with the faces of some 20th-century theologians, including B.B. Warfield, Cornelius Van Til, and Francis Schaeffer.

If an obscure face is too obscure, Missional Wear also offers a shirt with the word “Calvinism” on the front in a font that evokes the Coca-Cola brand.

Ten years ago, Christianity Today noted a resurgence in Calvinism in America, a “comeback” that was “shaking up the church.” To some it seemed this “New Calvinism” offered a more serious, more theological alternative to popular evangelical culture.

New Calvinists didn’t all embrace the term “New Calvinist,” or even “Calvinist,” but they did articulate a self-conception of rugged seriousness. They allied themselves against “the atheological, consumer-driven nature of the modern evangelical machine,” as the director of the Southern Baptist LifeWays Research once put it.

But there was still enough consumerism for Reformed lifestyle products. If you want, you can even get a shirt with Jonathan Edwards’s face on it.

— Daniel Silliman